Visual Art

Look here instead

Bay Area Now 7 proposes other routes through dark times

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arts@sfbg.com

VISUAL ART So far, 2014 has been a pretty depressing and demoralizing year for Bay Area artists and the organizations and institutions that support them. Increasingly, the only options seem to be "fight or flight," with "flight" too often becoming the default.Read more »

ID, please

QUEER ISSUE 2014 Photographer Sarah Deragon's Identity Project defines the LGBT community on its own terms.

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QUEER ISSUE "One night my wife and I were having a conversation with our friend from Brazil about the bear community, and she had no idea what we were talking about. She said there are no words for identities like bears, cubs, or otters in Brazil — and I realized that the queer community has all of these amazing identities that don't fall within the traditional LGBT umbrella. I got the idea to photograph my community and share with the world who they are and how they identify. I want to destroy the traditional understanding of what LGBT looks like. Read more »

Wear no evil

An introduction to sustainable style

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arts@sfbg.com

CULTURE

Do you know where your clothes come from: Bangladesh? China? Possibly. Clothes are a commodity whose origins are often taken for granted. Fashion followers glamorize garments as collectible items, while others value comfort above all. In most cases, customers will size up a garment's price or style first, rather than considering where or how it was manufactured.Read more »

Brilliant exodus

Arthur Szyk's 1930s Haggadah packs fresh visual punch.

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Saving Yosemite

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Long before Teddy Roosevelt and Ansel Adams swooned at the beauty of the place, ex-49er and early photographer Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) captured monumental Yosemite Valley for the public's eyes. His stunning 1860s wet-plate negative photos — on view at Stanford's Cantor Arts Gallery April 23-Aug. Read more »

Art is hard

CAREERS + ED ISSUE: It's up to our artists to save the Bay Area from becoming like everywhere else -- if they can hang in there. Hang in there!

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marke@sfbg.com

It's gotten so that I'm terrified of my own Facebook. Every time I refresh, it seems another artist is leaving the city. Last month alone it was two drag queens, a photographer, a painter, a couple writers, a gaggle of DJs, a singer. And actors, always actors. There have been fabulous farewell parties or simply abrupt messages. "I just bought a house in Austin." "Think I'm gonna love Seattle." "Chicago's where my head's at now." "Any hookups with Bushwick collectives?"Read more »

Curating the city

CAREERS + ED ISSUE: Gallery evictions signal a major shift in the art world, with the technology boom serving as the problem and its potential solution

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art@sfbg.com

Geary Boulevard runs almost the entire length of San Francisco, beginning in the middle of the Financial District, at the historic Lotta's Fountain. Along the first few blocks of one of the city's longest streets — amid a bustling community of corporate offices, luxury boutiques, and specialty coffee houses — the city oldest established art galleries have thrived. But that's changing.Read more »

Yesterday, today, and Tomorrow

Cartoonist Dan Perkins reflects on 25 years of 'This Modern World'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

VISUAL ART Tom Tomorrow's real name is Dan Perkins. This is important information if you ever happen to call him up, because you will have to squelch the urge to blurt out "Hi, Tom!" when he answers the phone.Read more »

Goldies 2014 Visual Art: Michelle Ramin

Up from Etsy, and beyond the masks we paint with social media

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marke@sfbg.com

GOLDIES The San Francisco Art Institute's landmark 2012 MFA exhibition sprawled through the kitschy Phoenix Hotel in the Tenderloin, partnering artists with often radically different styles in each room. Seen from one angle, it hilariously replicated one particular nostalgia-inducing area of the Internet: bright and noisy chatrooms, overflowing with random strangers, streaming with argument, affinity, and information overload.Read more »

The secret life of Sylvia Fein

The 94-year-old painter comes to terms with her surreality in a new retrospective

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